Grace Forms Blog

Guide to Government Grants; New York may be onto something

If common sense starts becoming more common in government, we may no longer need to offer our guide to government grants anymore. We are not exactly holding our breaths, but there is a lot of promise now coming out of New York. In a move that, for some reason, is shocking, New York announced that it was giving grant money to local governments that had a history of making the best use of that money. Why has it taken us so long to catch on to this basic nugget of wisdom?

 


While many in Washington are preparing for the end of the Bush-era tax cuts at the end of the year, New York is showing a different face. Whereas most state governments are looking to make up their budget deficits by spending less and taxing more, New York is choosing to spend the money more wisely. We can hardly blame other states. We never said “use common sense” in our guide to government grants, but in our defense, getting a grant is a confusing and esoteric process. Spending money in a sane and prudent matter is not exactly a hard concept to grasp.

 


Yet, this is the world we live in. We pay money to the government, and they dole it out to whoever meets certain requirements. This is all done in the name of our own good. Then we hear of government agencies blowing almost a million dollars for Las Vegas conventions and Columbian secret service prostitute scandals. Perhaps instead of a How to get a grant, we should be providing guides to ethical government spending. Actually, since New York seems to be catching on, maybe they can be the light-bearers on this one.

 


New York is not completely out of the woods, though. There are still certain conditions that apply, but this is a standard requirement to any grant and one we outline in our guide to government grants. The thing is, though, the timeframe should not be restricted to those who began their projects in 2010. Instead, the program should reach further back, and if that is at the expense of the amounts awarded to those receiving the grants, then so be it, but at least this sort of trial run can provide a wider view on how programs like this work in actuality instead of theory.

 


All in all, though, New York should be praised for its efforts in reforming the State’s philosophy on government spending. It is a basic and straight forward idea, but anything that helps improve government functionality is a boon. Hopefully, at some point, we will not need to offer our guide to government grants because the process will be so much more streamlined, but first things first. Learning how to spend money properly and efficiently is a far more important task than the means by which people and governments get grants. That alone should keep us busy for the foreseeable future, so we cross that bridge when we get there.

No Comments »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URL

Leave a comment